Data as an identity, diagnosis, health coach, drug and treatment by Prof. Rajendra Pratap Gupta, @rajendragupta

Electronic Health Records make data the identity for the patient. It can be in form of UHID or ADHAAR (in India). The data reveals the identity of the patient

Recently, I was in Bangladesh on the call of the Prime Minister’s office to speak on Big Data, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and to help draft the AI strategy for Bangladesh. I shared, that Big data is going to change the way we deliver healthcare, and how “big data combined with AI is not just data, but an identity, diagnosis, health coach, a drug and treatment when it comes to healthcare delivery”. It was based on the enormous possibility of what data & AI can do to healthcare delivery. 

Data as Identity: Electronic Health Records make data the identity for the patient. It can be in form of UHID or ADHAAR (in India). The data reveals the identity of the patient 

Data as diagnosis: According to Intel, AI in a single heartbeat can look at 10,000 attributes with 90 % accuracy and traditional methods look at 7 attributes with 56 % accuracy. Google’s AI algorithms help in diagnosing diabetic retinopathy. AI has been proven to be accurate in radiology for reading images and diagnosis. During the recent floods in Kerala, AI backed system, UptoDate was used by about 320 doctors in diagnosis and treatment. This solution has millions of cases in its repository and is used by clinicians worldwide, and the list goes on, on how Big Data and AI are helping in diagnosis. Big data and AI are increasingly being used as a diagnostic tool and its accuracy is of ‘clinical grade’ in specialties it has been used. 

Data as a health coach, a drug & Treatment: More than four years ago, I wrote an article on Software as a drug (SaaD) https://bit.ly/2TfWWDG 

Blue Star by Welldoc is a great example of how insulin dose can be calibrated by AI and does not need doctors. This mobile app for diabetes management is cleared by the US FDA, and it guides the patient to adjust the dosage of insulin with options of activity and diet (healthy choices with restaurant helpers), and provides with over 20,000 coaching messages and has been proven to reduce HBA1C by an average of 2 points between 3-6 months. This is considered a great achievement in the field of endocrinology. 

Need for an AI strategy: It is time that countries shape up their AI roadmap / strategy for every sector. Imagine if public hospitals in India like AIIMS, PGI Chandigarh, JIPMER, SGPGI & Tata Memorial feed in the daily OPD / IPD data and create an AI tool? How much the tool can help the ‘young medical graduates’ in accurate diagnostics and treatment? Today, timely diagnosis and treatment remains the biggest challenge in healthcare and it leads to over diagnosis and wrong treatment! With Ayushman Bharat covering over 500 million population, the data from this scheme can be used to create an AI tool in healthcare which can be shared with LMIC countries, and can serve as an important tool in form of healthcare diplomacy. Moreover, young medical graduate with such an AI tool with millions of cases in its repository will have the experience of a senior doctor with decades of experience when he or she uses an AI tool to diagnose and treat patients. Also, such a tool can prove to be a boon in rural areas as well, where people suffer the most.

In 2015, when I was writing a book on healthcare reforms (Healthcare Reforms in India – Making up for the lost decades), I did a survey with patients of RML & AIIMS and it was revealed that, patients visit an average of 6 doctors before visiting AIIMS, and add to this, the fact, that the reason for their AIIMS visit is, ‘treatment failure or not diagnosed’ from the earlier facilities or doctors visited! Moreover, it is not possible for everyone in India to reach AIIMS, Delhi or Tata Memorial in Mumbai. In such a serious situation, it makes sense for India to invest in developing an AI tool based on patient’s data in public healthcare facilities, and the patients covered under Ayushman Bharat. Also, this data can be used for fraud detection. 

AI is likely to create jobs and add to the economy. If India builds a proper AI strategy, it needs to look at the following components; Data storage, data security, data transfer, certifications and compliance, and each has the potential to add billion dollars to the economy 

Components of AI strategy: India needs a detailed roadmap for data storage, networking infrastructure, data governance, Sensors & IOT, training and human resources & research and development 

Big Data & AI hold a lot of promise for outcome driven healthcare which is accountable and affordable and India must aim to be a global leader in Big Data & AI.

(Prof. Rajendra Pratap Gupta is a leading public policy expert and is a former advisor to the Union Health Minister, Government of India ) 

The article was first published here, its republished on the HCITExperts Blog, with the author's permission

Author
Rajendra Pratap Gupta
Rajendra Pratap Gupta (Rajendra) is an original thinker and an innovator and one of the most influential and sought after public policy expert in the country. He has worked with some of the largest organizations across the world and was nominated to the Global Agenda Council of the World Economic Forum for 2012-2014 in recognition of his work.

He was conferred; 'Global Healthcare Leader of the Year' award in 2012 by the sheriff of Los Angeles; named the 'Thought Leader of the Year' three years in a row by ICT Post; Featured amongst the ’25 living Legends of Healthcare in India’ and is listed amongst the “100 Most Impactful Healthcare Leaders”.
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Data Analytics for cell and gene therapy by Dr. Ruchi Dass, @drruchibhatt



Cell and gene therapies are becoming more and more popular because of encouraging clinical results worldwide. Major pharma manufacturing companies have invested in the concept's commercialization worldwide. Recently, we read about Takeda’s license for commercialization of Aloficel (developed by TiGenix), Celgene’s acquisition of Juno Therapeutics or Gilead’s acquisition of Kite Pharma.

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Helping healing via the HORIZONS, The Tata Trusts Magazine

An ongoing transformation of Nagpur’s urban primary health centres has made affordable medical care more accessible to people

The patients sitting in the freshly painted waiting room have Amitabh Bachchan for company, even if it’s only a video of the movie star — with a message on measles vaccination — playing out on a television screen behind the reception desk. Red signboards provide an attractive pop of colour amidst the off-white walls. The well-appointed space could be part of a private hospital … except that it is not. It is the new look of a government-run urban primary health centre (UPHC) in Nagpur that has undergone a radical upgrade.

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India and Switzerland talk digital health by Aparna Kumaraswamy

A look back at the innovators and experts who showcased their technological solutions for enhanced healthcare delivery at the Digital Health Conclave 2019, curated by swissnex India

On 8th April, a group of healthcare enthusiasts got together to discuss the future of healthcare delivery, and the technologies that will assist in improving its quality. This motley group consisted of innovators, researchers, heads of large corporations, mid to senior level managers, and students from Switzerland and India. The one thing they had in common was their strong belief in the potential of technology to elevate the quality of healthcare and their openness to look across borders to find incredible innovations to this end. 

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Federated Personal Health Records – The Quest For #UseCases by Anukriti Chaudhary, @anukritichaudh2

In this blog post, we talk about one component of the National Health Stack – Federated Personal Health Records: its design, the role of policy and potential use cases


Overview

A federated personal health record refers to an individual’s ability to access and share her longitudinal health history without centralized storage of data. This means that if she has visited different healthcare providers in the past (which is often the case in a real life scenario), she should be able to fetch her records from all these sources, view them and present them when and where needed. Today, this objective is achieved by a paper-based ‘patient file’ which is used when seeking healthcare. However, with increasing adoption of digital infrastructure in the healthcare ecosystem, it should now be possible to do the same electronically. This has many benefits – patients need not remember to carry their files, hospitals can better manage patient data using IT systems, patients can seek remote consultations with complete information, insurance claims can be settled faster, and so on. This post is an attempt to look at the factors that would help make this a reality. 

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The obsession with tech in healthcare by Dr. Ravi Chandran Nayar

The logic that e-health can address the lack of medical professionals in India appears to be persuasive. But it is actually flawed

Medicine is an applied science and benefits from advances in basic and other applied sciences. In today’s world, technology itself is an applied science benefitting from basic scientific advances, defining our world and determining our world view of the present and future.

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Telemedicine and neurosciences by Dr Ganapathy Krishnan, @ApolloTeleMed

It is well documented that there is an acute shortage of neurologists and neurosurgeons in India and globally. Despite all efforts, it will be impossible to make available neurospecialists in all suburban and rural areas.

Simultaneously, there has been an exponential increase in the growth and development of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Plummeting costs and unbelievable sophistication in the availability of user-friendly mobile video conferencing devices is making distance meaningless. Geography has become History! Worldwide, the ultraconservative health care industry, in particular, the medical community, has been uniformly slow to adopt and embrace the use of ICT to extend their clinical reach. In the last decade, however, specialists in all branches of neurosciences are slowly accepting the inevitable that telemedicine must and will have to be incorporated into the core of the healthcare delivery system. This literature review summarizes the current use of telemedicine in different subspecialties of neurosciences. The author defines the growth and development of clinical telemedicine in India with special reference to Neurosciences and attempts to show the stellar role telemedicine has to play in enhancing the services provided by doctors. As clinicians regularly using technology, it should not be difficult for us to convince our patients that today a virtual remote consult and management can indeed effectively substitute for a physical face-to-face encounter.

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