Telemedicine and neurosciences by Dr Ganapathy Krishnan, @ApolloTeleMed

It is well documented that there is an acute shortage of neurologists and neurosurgeons in India and globally. Despite all efforts, it will be impossible to make available neurospecialists in all suburban and rural areas.

Simultaneously, there has been an exponential increase in the growth and development of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Plummeting costs and unbelievable sophistication in the availability of user-friendly mobile video conferencing devices is making distance meaningless. Geography has become History! Worldwide, the ultraconservative health care industry, in particular, the medical community, has been uniformly slow to adopt and embrace the use of ICT to extend their clinical reach. In the last decade, however, specialists in all branches of neurosciences are slowly accepting the inevitable that telemedicine must and will have to be incorporated into the core of the healthcare delivery system. This literature review summarizes the current use of telemedicine in different subspecialties of neurosciences. The author defines the growth and development of clinical telemedicine in India with special reference to Neurosciences and attempts to show the stellar role telemedicine has to play in enhancing the services provided by doctors. As clinicians regularly using technology, it should not be difficult for us to convince our patients that today a virtual remote consult and management can indeed effectively substitute for a physical face-to-face encounter.

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Comparison of #telemedicine with in-person care for follow-up after elective neurosurgery: results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of 1200 patients

Comparison of telemedicine with in-person care for follow-up after elective neurosurgery: results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of 1200 patients using patient-perceived utility scores


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Regulatory Essentials for e-Health in India by Dr. Milind Antani @milindantani




A doctor should not give any advice over electronic media that would ordinarily require the physical examination of the patient.
» The Supreme Court has noted that prescriptions should generally not be given out without actual examination.
» It has also stated that prescriptions should not be given over the telephone, except in case of emergency.

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#Telehealth In India: Slope of Enlightenment or Plateau of Productivity by Manish Sharma, @msharmas





Clayton Christensen coined the phrase disruptive innovation two decades ago as a way of embracing the deconstruction that is necessary when a new technology displaces an old one.

In healthcare most of the technology disruption has been driven by the adoption in the medtech space as also in the use of innovative techniques in surgery such as minimally invasive surgery and robotic surgery. 

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‘‘Doctor on the Go” Revolution Ready To Change The Reality of Healthcare by @Guneet_B




Digital technology in healthcare is booming at a rate that no one would ever have imagined. From smartphone apps to self-monitoring healthcare devices, the healthcare delivery system has started to change for the better.

Digitization in itself, however, must not be blamed for introducing changes in how healthcare has always been traditionally delivered to patients. The digitization of healthcare is expected to and has, in fact, successfully managed to handle some of the most common problems associated with traditional healthcare delivery models – long waiting times, ever increasing cost of healthcare, shortage of trained workforce, infrastructure problems, and intrusion into patient privacy and confidentiality. 

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