Showing posts with label blockchain. Show all posts
Showing posts with label blockchain. Show all posts

Monday, 16 October 2017

A collection of Potential Usecases for #Blockchain in Healthcare


Every once in a while a new technology finds its way in the Gartner Hype Cycle for Technologies (in Healthcare) and its effectiveness and usability is applied to the management and interoperability of Healthcare Records. For instance, access to the Healthcare records by various stakeholders in the care continuum: care providers and patients. 




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Monday, 29 May 2017

What is #BlockChain? Implications for Healthcare by @msharmas

In my previous article I discussed about the benefits and barriers to the use of an Integrated Health Information Platform. In healthcare the need for presenting the Information to the Right Person at the Right Time has been proven to improve outcomes in patient treatment.

Will HIE 2.0 benefit from the use of Blockchain in presenting the information to the Right Person at the Right Time? 


What is Blockchain?
Various definitions of Blockchain have been put across based on the context of the use. Some of these definitions are: 

A digital ledger in which transactions made in bitcoin or another cryptocurrency are recorded chronologically and publicly.

“The blockchain is an incorruptible digital ledger of economic transactions that can be programmed to record not just financial transactions but virtually everything of value.” Don & Alex Tapscott, authors Blockchain Revolution (2016)

The Blockchain is a decentralized ledger of all transactions across a peer-to-peer network. Using this technology, participants can confirm transactions without the need for a central certifying authority. Potential applications include, fund transfers, settling trades, voting etc.

Blockchain is a distributed system for recording and storing transaction records. More specifically, blockchain is a shared, immutable record of peer-to-peer transactions built from linked transaction blocks and stored in a digital ledger. [1]

A Blockchain is a data structure that can be timed-stamped and signed using a private key to prevent tampering. There are generally three types of Blockchain: public, private and consortium. [6] 

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Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Unintended consequences of new technologies in healthcare – thoughts on #blockchains pt 2 by Dr. Senthil N @nacsen


In part one of this blog I discussed blockchains and how they could be used in health care in an ideal world. 

In the real world however, block chain use poses many challenges. The challenges range from security to accessibility perspectives, some of which are unique to health care. In a healthcare blockchain, each unique identifier is a human being, not a piece of cryptocurrency. So, anyone with access to a blockchain can see how many transactions a patient has had and their timestamps, then extrapolate how healthy or sick a person has been. 

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Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Unintended consequences of new technologies in healthcare – thoughts on #blockchains, Part 1 by Dr. Senthil @nacsen


Many of you might have read the recent findings by researchers Isao Echizen et al. from the National Institute of Informatics (NII) of Japan that it is possible to copy one’s fingerprints from pictures taken from up to 10 feet from the subject who was holding a peace sign, given proper lighting and focus. As cameras with more than 20 megapixel resolution become commonplace, many daylight photographs would meet this criteria. It is not farfetched to imagine that one could copy iris patterns from portrait photographs just as easily. For the majority of the world population with darker eye colors, their iris patterns would not be clearly visible in the visible light wavelength, which is why iris scanners use near-infrared wavelengths. 

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Saturday, 20 August 2016

Why Out-of-Hospital Blockchains Matter by Cyrus Maaghul @Pointnurse

Bitcoin and blockchain technology will be game changers too

This article was first published in Mr. Cyrus Maaghul's LinkedIn Pulse post here . The article is published here with the author's permission.

I bought my first bitcoin in May 2013 while on a vegan retreat in Asheville, North Carolina. Going through the purchase process reminded me of when I first downloaded Mosaic and surfed the net. I thought to myself, "this is going to be a game changer". It was.

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